Top

In Case You Missed It

According to a new report from the International Institute of Management Development, the United States is still the world’s most competitive economy.  The World Competitiveness Year Book for 2008 rates such factors as economic growth, quality of life and enviornmental responsibility.  It ranks 55 economies based on more than 250 criteria.  The rankings are based, in part, on an annual survey of top and mid-level executives in 55 countries.

Twenty years ago, Japan topped the ratings -before the financial crisis of the late 1980’s and ’90’s.  China’s ranking fell to #17 from #15 this year because of higher inflation and the fast-growing economy’s strain on the environment.  But Brazil’s ranking rose to #43 from #49 in 2007.

Selective listings are below:

US #1 in 2008, In 2007: #1

Singapore #2 in 2008, In 2007: #2

Hong Kong #3 in 2008, In 2007: #3

Canada #10 in 2008, In 2007: #8

Netherlands #8 in 2008, In 2007: #10

Germany  #16 in 2008  In 2007: #16

United Kingdom  #20 in 2008  In 2007: #21

Japan  #24 in 2008  In 2007: #22

India  #27 in 2008  In 2007: #29

Korea  #29 in 2008  In 2007: #31

Spain  #30 in 2008  In 2007: #33

Philippines  #40 in 2008  In 2007: #43

Brazil  #49 in 2008  In 2007: #43

Mexico  #47 in 2008  In 2007: #50

South Africa  #50 in 2008  In 2007: #53

This should not be an opportunity to gloat.  Here in the United States, the conservative media enjoys criticizing the school’s when negative news appears.   But when Thomas Friedman in The World Is Flat discusses the globally competitive world and that India and China have become more globally competitive, we need to realize that American schools have kept America globally competitive.

Share